Prototyping Firefox With CSS Grid

Prototyping with HTML and CSS grid is really helpful for understanding flexibility models. I was able to understand how my design works in a way that was completely different than doing it in a static design program.

Links:

Transcript:
So I’m working on a design of the new address bar in Firefox. Our code name for it is the QuantumBar. There’s a lot of pieces to this. But one of the things that I’ve been trying to figure out is how it fits into the Firefox toolbar and how it collapses and expands, the squishiness of the toolbar, and trying to kinda rethink that by just building it in code. So I have this sort of prototype here where I’ve recreated the Firefox top toolbar here in HTML, and you can see how it like collapses and things go away and expands as I grow and shrink this here.

I’ve used CSS Grid to do a lot of this layout. And here I’ve turned on the grid lines just for this section of the toolbar. It’s one of the many grids that I have here. But I wanna point out these like flexible spaces over here, and then this part here, the actual QuantumBar piece, right? So you can see I’ve played around with some different choices about how big things can be at this giant window size here. And I was inspired by my friend, Jen Simmons, who’s been talking about Grid for a long time, and she was explaining how figuring out whether to use minmax or auto or fr units. It’s something that is, you can only really figure out by coding it up and a little trial and error here. And it allowed me to understand better how the toolbar works as you squish it and maybe come up with some better ways of making it work.

Yeah, as we squish it down, maybe here we wanna prioritize the width of this because this is where the results are gonna show up in here, and we let these flexible spaces squish a little sooner and a little faster. And that’s something that you can do with Grid and some media queries like at this point let’s have it squished this way, at this point let’s have it squished another way. Yeah, and I also wanted to see how it would work then if your toolbar was full of lots of icons and you have the other search bar and no spacers, how does that work? And can we prioritize maybe the size of the address bar a little more so that because you’ll notice on the top is the real Firefox, we can get in weird situations where this, it’s just not even usable anymore. And maybe we should stop it from getting that small and still have it usable.

Anyway it’s a thing I’ve been playing with and what I’ve found was that using HTML and CSS to mock this up had me understand it in a way that was way better than doing it in some sort of static design program.

Originally posted on the Firefox UX blog.